diabetic feet and ingrown toenails

My husband suffers from ingrowing toe nails. He is due to have surgery but is so worried about infection. He had an infection after the podiatrist nicked the skin when clipping the nail. It took nearly a month to heal. Should he have the surgery or not.

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Feb 12, 2017
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by: Dominic

Unfortunately when someone does your feet and they are using sharp tools then cutting someone is a risk. it sounds flippant, but there can be no guarantee. If someone has ingrown toenails and the nail has already gone into the skin then the toe is at risk- the skin has been breached.

Conservative removal of the nail spike will lead to bleeding because you have to remove that nail- which is in the skin. Luckily it is in a clinical setting where any open areas should be dressed appropriately.

Diabetes, unfortunately reduces your immunity and reduces how quickly you heal. If your blood sugars are irregular then that too is going to have a large effect.

No-one can say to have the nails removed apart from who is doing it and the patient. Things to consider though: If the toenails are a long standing issue- or an issue that can not be resolved simply, then in the long run it might be better to have them removed and then monitor the patients progress on a regular basis. Diabetes adds a risk- which needs to be taken into consideration.

Feb 12, 2017
Rating
starstarstarstarstar

by: Dominic

Unfortunately when someone does your feet and they are using sharp tools then cutting someone is a risk. it sounds flippant, but there can be no guarantee. If someone has ingrown toenails and the nail has already gone into the skin then the toe is at risk- the skin has been breached.

Conservative removal of the nail spike will lead to bleeding because you have to remove that nail- which is in the skin. Luckily it is in a clinical setting where any open areas should be dressed appropriately.

Diabetes, unfortunately reduces your immunity and reduces how quickly you heal. If your blood sugars are irregular then that too is going to have a large effect.

No-one can say to have the nails removed apart from who is doing it and the patient. Things to consider though: If the toenails are a long standing issue- or an issue that can not be resolved simply, then in the long run it might be better to have them removed and then monitor the patients progress on a regular basis. Diabetes adds a risk- which needs to be taken into consideration.

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